Friday, October 31, 2008

politics

Generally, I decline to discuss politics with my friends. This is because I want to stay friends with them. Since I joined Facebook, however, I've been getting some insight into where some of them fall on the political spectrum, and it's been interesting. Especially as election day approaches, a lot of them have expressed their political views by posting videos, giving virtual campaign paraphernalia to other friends, updating their status with political messages, etc.

I have one friend who is "amazed" at Sarah Palin's intelligence and strength, while another wonders, "How can anyone take Sarah Palin seriously?" Two of my friends (who are not acquainted with each other) have joined a group called "Excuse me, but has anyone else noticed that Sarah Palin is insane?" I have at least one friend who has joined a group in favor of California's Proposition 8, and at least one friend who has joined a group opposing it. Some have sent each other virtual campaign buttons for McCain, others for Obama. A few have said they are afraid of what will happen if one candidate or the other gets elected president. One posted a video attacking Palin's feminist credentials; another posted a video questioning Obama's legal eligibility for the office of President of the United States. One writes that she voted for Obama, while another says simply, "I voted." My AP US History teacher from high school weighs in, giving a prediction on how the electoral college numbers will work out.

I'm glad my friends are passionate about politics, and I'd like to think that they'd be able to discuss the issues with their opponents in a reasonable way. But when it comes down to it, I'm not willing to put that assumption to the test. I'm not sure if that says more about me, or them.

5 comments:

Nicole said...

ha. that "excuse me, but..." group makes me laugh.

yeah, i've learned a lot about some of my family and friends over the past few months, much of which has been quite surprising--and not in a good way. i'm beginning to fear that no one i know is capable of rational thought, at least when it comes to politics.

Octavia said...

The rhetoric in this election has just been unbelievable at both ends of the spectrum. The vitriol, the ad hominem attacks, the outright lies that people take at face value and pass on as "fact" ... I sometimes wonder if there's a silent, rational majority out there, or if all the sound and fury is the only reality.

Heidi said...

Me, I've learned to keep my mouth shut... it's just safer, healthier, and friendlier this way. And I just keep my fingers crossed behind my back...

Octavia said...

:) Exactly.

AnnieD said...

Tonight when I got in the van to come home, our driver immediately started in on how tired he is of the election. This ultimately led to a pretty interesting discussion of how the process has gone and how badly it needs to be fixed. The lack of transparency on both sides and the negative ads were high on the list of Things Needing To Change. Anyway, the discussion was civil, and examples from both sides were used.

I mentioned an ad I really do like: our state treasurer (a dem) is retiring, and he's endorsing his assistant treasurer, who is a republican, saying he's done the job for 10 years and he knows what he's doing. He ends by saying, "Our dollars aren't red or blue, they're green." It's an impressive ad, and actually influenced my thinking. Go bi-partisanship!